Running Out of Gas

Running Out of Gas

I run out of gas often. Not figuratively, as you might expect from a post like this. Literally.  No kidding.  There is almost no thrill greater to me than seeing the fuel gauge blink for days. I believe, in life, that risk is the reward. Yes, risk is the reward, and I will stand by that. For many years I drove an SUV and had only a few days mileage on a twenty gallon tank. What a thrill! I’d run out of gas at least once a year and I’d love it.  Thanks to AAA, rescue was only thirty minutes away.  In 2007, I decided that my impact on the environment was bugging me.  I had just seen the documentary “Who Killed the Electric Car” and decided to stick it to big oil.

So, that Fall, I ordered a Toyota Prius from my local dealership. I learned that all of Toyota’s first cars on the lot are silver. So I chose silver so I could have the first one. At that time, Larry David, star of HBO’s Curb Your Enthusiasm, had a silver Prius, so I wanted a silver Prius.  A month or so later, the Prius arrives and I am amazed at the mileage. Not quite the 55 MPG they tell you in the commercial but, after ten years, I still get more than 40 MPG easy. That’s triple — yes, TRIPLE what my Jeep Grand Cherokee got. So I’m driving like I’ve never driven before. Not fast. Because the sweet spot on a Prius is 40. So I’m going 40 everywhere of course. The lead foot jerk behind be can take a pill.  So you would think, after getting a car that gets better mileage, I’d never run out of gas again, right? Wrong!  Still, in my Prius, I run out of gas at least once per year. Am I forgetful? Maybe. Am I lazy? Maybe. Are these the reasons I pass six gas stations with an empty tank? Nope!

The best way to illustrate this feeling in pop culture is an episode of “Seinfeld” entitled “The Dealership” where Kramer lures the car salesman into a test drive in a Saab 900 NG convertible.  They go for the test drive and Kramer misses the turn to go back to the dealership; instead, he plans to give the car a full test of a Kramer daily routine.  Initially, the salesman is confused.  This is where it gets fun.  With his errands run, Kramer’s next test is to take the car to the limits of its fuel tank.  The car salesman riding with Kramer gets thrilled at driving with the gasoline needle below empty.  Kramer and the salesman, with the dealership in sight, decide instead to go for it in the manner of Thelma and Louise. The car however, soon rolls to a stop. Kramer exits the car after saying, “Well, I’ll think about it.”

This is how I handle most days.  Many of you may think that a man who has won twenty thousand cases and run a business for more than fifteen years would never say he’s wrong.  You’re wrong.  As illustrated above, I am constantly fulfilled by choices. This one included. How did you find this page? Exactly! Let’s connect based on content!

One response

  1. Great writing. Great story. Glad to see you enjoy life to it’s fullest. Also one of my favorite Seinfeld episodes.

    Seize the day.

    Don

    >

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Living by Accident

Sometimes Risk is the Reward

Hi-Tech P.I.

Helping people see the forest for the trees, online.

Holmes, P.I.™

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